The Blog

Pichuco Movie and a Milonga Night!

What an exciting opportunity we have! Come join us for Pichuco, the movie and Milonga night!
I have been contacted by a close friend of the director to offer to show this documentary on the tango orchestra leader, Anibal Troilo, nicknamed, Pichuco. He heard the magical instrument of tango, the bandoneon, when he was little and got his first one when he was 10 years old. Come learn Pichuco postermore about this influential musician, the music and the orchestra. THEN stay for a milonga!

November 21st
Movie starts promptly @ 7:35pm Milonga to follow.
Please arrive by 7pm to find your spot.
Bring a chair or a pillow, there will be some chairs available.
First come first served.
BYOB
$15 covers the cost of the movie & milonga.
$10 goes directly to the Director
Pichuco group

SYNOPSIS:
A professor at the Escuela de Música Popular de Avellaneda (School of Popular Music of Avellaneda)  is in the process of digitizing close to 500 original manuscripts  with the help of his students. Arrangements from the Aníbal ¨Pichuco¨ Troilo Orchestra that have been preserved until now. Through interviews with musicians from several generations and styles, who play live the most memorable songs from the master, this documentary takes a musical journey through the works of one of the main characters in the history of Tango and of the Argentine music. 80 minutes (Spanish with subtitles)

♫ MORE INFORMATION TRAILER: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vb2aZnZyuMM FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/PichucoFilm TWITTER: www.twitter.com/PichucoFilm IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3689614 WEB: www.pichucofilm.com

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Workshops with Daniela and Rommel – Together!

Rommel Oramas and I will be teaching 8 workshops together! This is a fantastic opportunity to get the best of both of us.

2012 SF Competition with Rommel4 Saturdays
November 15 & 22 and December 6 & 13

4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
For the Beginner / Intermediate Dancer

November 15 – Tools for a Positive Milonga Experience
November 22 – Tools for a Positive Milonga Experience – Part 2
December 6 – Elegance and Fluidity -Walking and Ochos
December 13 – Elegance and Fluidity – Cruzada and Molinete

$80 for all 4 classes

5:30pm – 7:00pm
For the Intermediate / Advanced Dancer

November 15 – Free Leg vs Standing Leg for the Leader and the Follower
November 22 – Super Cool Moves: boleos, enrosques, volcadas, etc. etc. etc.
December 6 – Dancing to Alternative Music vs Classic Golden Age – part 1
December 13 – Dancing to the Music – continuing sequences  – part 2

$80 for all 4 classes

SNAP (Scottsdale Neighborhood Arts Place)
4425 N. Granite Reef Rd. Scottsdale, AZ

PLEASE RSVP
Maximum of 16 dancers per class

Classes can be taken a la carte or any 4 for $80. WHAT A DEAL!

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Technique with Maxi and Jesica Friday

As you probably are aware, Maximiliano Cristiani and Jesica Arfenoni are back in town for workshops, private lessons and performances. We have created a schedule of classes that is progressive in nature starting with a Leader and Followers Technique class on Friday night. No partner necessary just a desire to work on yourself. Maxi & Jess 4

Friday 8:00pm – 9:30pm Followed by an informal practica: a chance to just dance and to ask Maxi and Jesica questions.

Why take a technique class? Let alone focused only on myself for a couples dance?
I think this is a good question.
Technique is a fundamental basic part of your dance. Like a building, if this isn’t well established you will not be as sturdy. How many times have you asked about how to improve your balance or about how to do a more elegant embellishment? Or how about those enrosques that you have been wanting to try? All of these and more are possible when you understand your own body and have a technique to build upon.
I have found that taking technique classes helps me to find my own axis and to be clear about it on my own. It allows me the time and space to make connections to things in my dance that get blurred when working within the couple: like the relationship of my arms to my pelvis, for example. What? They are related??? See!

If you need more information contact Rommel 928-301-5215. I can only encourage you to support the improvement of your dance and take advantage of these 2 great teachers.

And lastly – $50 for the Friday class and practica and we will include the Saturday milonga. It all happens at Bond Hall at SNAP 4425 N. Granite Reef Rd. Scottsdale, AZ.

 

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Tuesdays Class Titles

As promised here are my ideas for Tuesdays upcoming classes. Class begins at 7:00pm – 8:30pm at SNAP 4425 N. Granite Reef Scottsdale, AZ.
The topics are subject to change depending on who attends the class. The class is designed for the Intermediate dancer.  As always class is $15.
See you there!

DATE Class Title
October 7 MUSIC – D’arienzo, Biagi, and Co. – Rhythmic Orquestas
October 14 MUSIC – Di Sarli and Co.  – Melodic Orquestas
October 21 MUSIC – Pugliese – How to be dramatic!
October 28 MUSIC – Ideas for Dancing to Alternative or Nuevo music
November 4 Milonga
November 11 Vals
November 18 Turns for Social Dancing
November 25 Classic Salon Structures
December 2 Sequences with Sacadas
December 9 Social Boleos
December 16 Sweet Social Combinations! And PARTY!!!
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Tango Etiquette and the Infamous Cabeceo

The rituals surrounding the milonga are prized among dancers. Almost like a rite of passage that once you know and have put them into practice you feel like you have actually been admitted into the social realm of Argentine Tango.

Fanning HerselfCabeza translates to “head” and a cabezeo is a nod of the head. This “codigo” or custom signals the invitation to dance. You do not need to approach someone to ask them to dance you can merely catch their eye, nod your head, and if there is a nod in response you have an agreement to dance. The follower will stay seated to wait for the nodee to come to her table to be sure that there is no confusion in a crowded milonga.

There is a lot written about this custom and in the US many argue for it and against it. The cabezeo means never having to say “no”. If you choose not to accept a cabeceo, you merely look away and no one needs to know.

Some milongas are small and it is convenient and expected to use the cabeceo. Other milongas are in very large dance halls and it is very difficult to cabeceo long distances. In this case the dancer looking for a dance (either the lead or follow) may approach who they would like to dance with and try to make eye contact from a closer distance. The goal is always to be subtle and polite. If you are at a milonga in a new city, observe to see what the locals are doing.
(Taken from the Tango Workbook Draft)

I want to make it clear at this point that I am not arguing the usefulness of this invitation, or the reason why it exists or why many people outside of Argentina (read mainly US, where I am most familiar) are very attached to this codigo. Tango etiquette and the infamous Cabeceo are part of the allure of the milonga! But I had a very interesting experience during my most recent trip to Buenos Aires.

I had the pleasure of taking several fantastic classes with well known teachers/dancers / performers. And the one remark that applies here is the following: “Times are different in Buenos Aires’ Milongas. Each milonga now has their own etiquette. Not every milonga uses the same rules.” And this applied to the cabeceo as well. There are milongas in Buenos Aires that are very ritualized and very adamant about los codigos. It is very clear from the moment you enter those milongas, I think you can feel it in the air, if you can’t see it right away. There are milongas where the women are seated by the hosts on one side of the dance floor and the gentlemen on the other, with the veterans or the faithful attendees sitting at their reserved and expected table every week. Ironically the spacing of these milongas usually adds to the ritual, as you often can not walk around and seek dancers out, you must be found at your seat or do the seeking from your seat, thus the cabeceo functions pretty well.

There are other dancing casuallymilongas where you find dancers searching for their friends, (in a dimly lit crowded space) and the gentlemen will approach a table, wait for the woman to look at him and nod respectfully and sometimes even ask, “Bailas”? If the woman ignores his hangout out by her table, he moves on. (Just as there are milongas where the dress code is different.)

Other milongas are in very large halls, a cabezeo from your seat would be almost ridiculous, although it is done. As the ladies scan the seated gentlemen during the cortinas,  you may spy a head nodding dramatically, emphatically and adamantly with eyebrows lifted in your direction. I think it is important to remember too that in Buenos Aires, if you do not live there and are only visiting, that you are entering into their weekly ritual. Dancers have milongas that they regularly attend and expect to see their friends and favorite dancers there. I always recommend that if you go to Buenos Aires, you must go for no less than 3 weeks and make your schedule milonga -filled (if that is your intention, which usually it is). Dancers will begin to recognize you and you will see what the etiquette is for those milongas you attend.

Generally speaking the milonga rules and codes are good ones. They respect others, the flow of the dance, and yet, the cabeceo is the one that people have the hardest time with. It takes a little practice and it’s not so unfamiliar to us in this culture. I see it among the young crowd in a “hey, what’s up man”, accompanied by a nod of the head.

Happy Dancing!

(Quote taken from The Tango Workbook that is currently in a draft stage.)

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